art, article, Donald Trump, HATRED, Journalism, social media, Uncategorized

Creative Resistance- How Art is fighting back Donald Trump

A picture is worth a thousand words.

Illma Gore knows that these words hold water. Having suffered backlash for her nude portrait with a micro-penis of the now incumbent President of the United States, Donald Trump, she began work on a piece of art, painted with human blood– 20 pints donated by those who share her cause- in association with activist collective INDECLINE as a protest against the election. Hers is not the sole crusade against the anti-feminist, anti-inclusion tainted president who now reigns as the leader of the free world. Another prominent artist, Shepard Fairey, released three politically charged posters, featuring an African-American, a Muslim and Latino women, titled “We the People”. All the three religious/ethnic groups had previously come under ire from the erstwhile presidential candidate, and Fairey felt the need to visually depict the same, in order to highlight their imminent vulnerability under his administration.

Another piece of art came under the political spotlight and it belonged to Richard Prince, an artist whose Instagram picture featuring Ivanka Trump, had earned him a $36000 bounty. In an act of protest, he denounced the work and returned the payment. His argument stated that as a means of an honest protest, he had to exercise his discretion regarding the Trumps, and that they ’are not art.’ Mr. Trump himself is apparently not an art person at all, his government planning on drastic cuts in the spending,including a probable elimination of National Endowment for the Arts and National Endowment for the Humanities, The Hill reported. The massive outburst against the palpable concerns of a population that considers the election as a national catastrophe is majorly pivoted around the same issue, if not having stemmed from it.

What prompts these protests? Such a collective response to an election, on a scale that has never been witnessed before, prompts an intense soul-searching, although it doesn’t take long for the water to boil. The populace that voted against Trump and his policies are now trying to galvanize fear and angst against his election and stand in opposition to his decrees. Many artists supported a strike on January 20th, which called for an “act of non-compliance” and urged museums, galleries, theatres and galleries to remain closed for the day. The J20 Art Strike witnessed response from places around the country albeit in different ways. While mass outspoken dissent has taken over the stage prior and following the election result, those whose voices have no public platform for outcry have taken to social media and visual medium to cut across barriers. Dozens of banners with messages of inclusivity and anti-racism adorned the buildings across Philadelphia and Atlanta on the Inauguration day.

All the dissenters speak one tongue, inspite of different mediums which emphasizes non-acceptance of divisive attitude, corrosive of the ideas of equality enshrined in a democracy. The paradigm shift in the concept of identity and the argument of white supremacy that underlines Trump’s narrative is the fodder that fuels the artistic cannons, whose call for arms is loud, distinct and unavoidable.

cover picture: fusion.net

article, HATRED, politics, religion, Uncategorized

Nihilism, Death of religion and rise in Organized crime

Angry

The internet spells doom for religion, and an ever-rising graph for organized crime, which has become a bane to our modern society. While the murder of Akhlaq over beef consumption was the writing on the wall for organized religion and its dominance, which often transcends notions of moral law and societal constructs, it spits straight in the face of those who claim that religion is adequate moral police for individuals. While faith without religion is a vain exercise for self-affirmation, religion without faith only aims to train men to toe the religious line of man-made dogmas without any inherent understanding of their individual beliefs. While virtual life creates a parallel world of greater self expression and social cohesiveness among faiths that did not necessarily pre-exist before modern times, it also in a varied sense, limits the real perception of the individual and the moral tone which binds us irrevocably with our environment.

By death of religion, which is apparent in my essay’s title, I do not mean the literal death of religion as an organized social construct, but as a life-force which dominates man’s actions which provide a pathway to heaven, nirvana or any other zenith of self-realization and oneness with God. As we see, there is a rise in the number of Atheists, Agnostics and generally the ‘nowhere in particular’ kinds of people all across the world. That is not to imply that religion has died; just that it holds less credence with its populace. To practice faith without an over-arching system of imposed religious practices is what people at large are turning towards. It only seems rational, to dissociate oneself from tenets of organized religion and exercise one’s faith independently. It wouldn’t be incorrect to say that as religion is moving away from being pathway to the creator and increasingly becoming insurmountable defense to facilitate immoral activities under the garb of religious fervor. Moving from the issues of organized religion to those of organized crimes, there is an increment in the incessant tussle between the rational and religion. Incidents such as those that recently occurred at Mathura, and those in the recent past, as the Akhlaq murder incident, I see undertones of Nihilistic philosophy of the self-proclaimed Godmen/Cult leaders who manage to lure the impoverished, illiterate masses, and on occasions, even the rational.

Nihilism, as a philosophy propounded by Nietzsche, believes in total boycott of established rules and institutions, and often, a need for violent activities, or for that matter, any revolutionary activity, that is aimed at being destructive to oneself and society. Nihilists more oft than not, try to transcend the boundaries of moral laws as well as those established by the society, in order to prove their own ideology as superior to others. A similar theory is expressed succinctly and ostracized by Dostoevsky in his opus magnum, Crime and Punishment, through the characters of Raskolnikov and Svidrigailov. Absence of absolute religion and ideas of social influence lead men to the path of heinous crimes and gross misinterpretation of their own actions as being rationalistic as opposed to utilitarian. Self proclaimed leaders like Ram Vriksha Yadav, with their inordinate demands along with other ‘Satyagrahis’, are real-life nihilists who jump the lines of law and order with the grace of a lame frog.

What connects these modern nihilists to the concords of followers of organized religion is the methodology with which they work. Absence of a strong groundwork of faith, which is often replaced by fanaticism and absolutist ideology, shakes the very foundation of such unions. Forceful super-imposition of their rights over those of others and resorting to inordinate methods to exert power leads to unfortunate circumstances as those aforementioned.  While there are a number of reasons like cultural political and social factors, many studies have claimed to show a positive correlation between crime and dearth of adequate religious fervor. While religious hypocrisy holds its shaky stand on faith, these vigilantes need to rein in their bovine love and attach it to a more realistic understanding of humanity. Religion cannot, and must not be used to justify murder. Taking the law in one’s own hands is no solution in an apparently democratic and secular setup. Ambiguous religious identity and nihilistic attitudes that exacerbate tense situations need to be guarded from becoming absolutist ideas.